RAY

(book, exhibition, application)

Summary

In RAY (2013-2014) Susanne Kriemann examines a radioactive rock discovered in the Barringer Hill Mine in Llano, Texas, in the late 1800s. We see a photograph of a large rock (a single chunk of gadolinite), and then another image of a wall of rocks, signalling the importance of the threshold to Kriemann’s work. She focuses on the material and mystical limit of knowing and seeing on how a narrative loops through archaeological layers without ever finding its source. Presently, the mine lies beneath a lake; its mirrored surface resembles the photographic lens, but the eye, ours and the rock’s, exists on both sides.

Etc.

www.ingirumimusnocteetconsumimurigni.de

Het Licht

(newspaper, photowork, poster)

Summary

In Het Licht (2011-2012), Susanne Kriemann deals with the disappearance of a specific site: the Art Deco building ‘Het Licht’ (The Light), a former newspaper printing workshop in Ghent. Photographing the building in a state of abandoned decay a month before its demolition, Kriemann allows her subject’s physical dissolution to reverberate through an ‘aesthetics of ephemerality’, capturing ‘The Light’ through the light of past moments.

Etc.

newspaper

photo work

poster

277569

(publication, photowork)

Summary

The work entitled 277569 (2011-2012) consists of aerial photographs taken by Kriemann in 2012 while flying over the south of Berlin in a helicopter. The title reflects the number of airlift flights undertaken during the blockade of Berlin in 1948/49. Barely revealing any details, the 6 x 6 slides show tiny segments of an endless expanse of forest, with the paths that cut through it lending the motif the appearance of an abstract composition due to the lack of sharply defined points of focus. Preceding the photographs is a drawing based on the path of a reconnaissance flight that took place in 1947, also to the south of Berlin. Indicated are the points where photographs were taken en route; the numbers correspond to the specific photographs found in the National Archive II in Washington DC, a portion of which Kriemann was able to view. Such images belong to an immense collection of some six million photographs, an archive of aerial photographs taken during flights over the official air corridor between West Berlin and West Germany during the Cold War.

Etc.

publication

Gestein

(publication, photowork)

Summary

The photographs ‘Gestein I – V’ (2011) are part of Kriemann’s ongoing interest in blurring the boundaries between abstract and representational imagery – the quarry’s haggard rock faces resembles the stacks of dusty books Kriemann so often encounters in her various archival explorations (the book itself could be singled out as one of Kriemann’s favorite media), but observed at closer rage they also invoke memories of American abstract painting. The truly haunting presence, however, is that Albert Renger-Patzsch (German, 1897 – 1966), the celebrated master of New Objective photography, who in 1966, the year of his death, photographed this very same quarry (the images were collected in the book ‘Gestein’). Kriemann’s images of layers of encrusted time enact the archaeological impulse at the heart of her working method, while simultaneously paying homage to the rigorous, quasi-scientific aesthetic of one of photography’s enduring icons.
 (Dieter Roelstraete)

Etc.

Yellow

(photowork)

Summary

In ‘Yellow I, II’ (2011) the biological decomposition of organic material is contrasted with the dissolution of the subject in a poetic visual language. Crumbling dried flowers are just plain floral pulp, like the paper of photography. The principles of resolution and repetition run like a red thread through this work. In the exhibition, the image with the flowers is mirrored into the abstract yellow image. The mirroring appears and disappears while moving through the space.

Etc.

photowork

A silent crazy jungle under glass

(exhibition)

Summary

In the work A Silent Crazy Jungle Under Glass (2011 – 2014) Kriemann combines historical forms of abstraction with aspects of the archive, the latter being a topic that has been crucial for her for a long time. The most interesting question here concerns references to reality: in an archive they are highly desirable, in photography they are inevitable and in abstraction they are unwanted. Setting out from visual analogies between archives and abstraction a number of other questions are stimulated: do a lot of archives not lack the relation to everyday life, to reality? And thus, do they not turn into an epitome of the perfect abstract picture?
(Mousse Magazine, 2011)

Number One

(book)

Summary

Artist book, 80 pages, colour, 30 x 42 cm, unbound in wooden case; 2011
The images in Number One were photographed in the Musée Zadkine, in the village of Les Arques in the south of France, during my residency in 2011. Depicted were sculptures, drawings, carpets and printed matter by the artist Zadkine on exhibition there. The images document granite and wood, textile and offset. However, what we hold in hands is inkjet on paper.

Etc.

Reading

(catalogue)

Summary

Texts by Hans Dickel, Övül Durmuşoğlu, Matts Leiderstam & Susanne Kriemann, Vanessa Joan Müller, Lisa Puyplat, Dieter Roelstraete, Monika Szewczyk, Mirjam Varadinis, Axel John Wieder;

The book is comprised of texts on Susanne Kriemann’s practice and its relation to the concept of Reading in a wider sense: reading photographs, archives, and texts and transforming these into new compositions with photography, urban space, and historiography. Nine authors have approached intertextuality’s various manifestations and meanings and in doing so, confront the notion of reading (of text, image, object, context). The authors trace the permeation of the intermedial in Susanne Kriemann’s work in various ways. Quotes from writers, scientists and journalists dispersed throughout the book touch on themes present in Susanne Kriemann’s work, both deepening as well as linking it to the current discourse of art in general.

Designed by NODE Berlin Oslo

published by Sternberg Press

2011, English/German
12.5 x 20.5 cm, 216 pages, hardcover
ISBN 978-1-934105-49-8

One Day

(book)

Summary

For ‘One Day’ (2010) Kriemann collected a long list of books about Rotterdam, all of which have been published since its devastating bombing by the Luftwaffe in May 1940. The second largest city in The Netherlands and arguably the most culturally diverse, Rotterdam is unique in that its rebuilding did not focus on restoring the pre-war urban fabric, but instead became a multi-faceted experiment in architecture and urban planning that at times mirrors, and at times seems at odds with its evolving social composition. From the books she collected, which document Rotterdam’s evolution, Kriemann selected 115 images and imposed a structure that is at once drastic and mundane: The flow of images in her book condense the experience of time by subtly tracing the course of one day, from dawn until dusk.

Etc.

Grammar

(catalogue)

Summary

This catalogue documents all of the material that Susanne Kriemann has compiled over several years for her three works: “One Time One Million”, “12 650 000” and “Ashes and broken brickwork of a logical theory”.

The illustrated book was published on the occasion of the prize winner exhibition Susanne Kriemann – GASAG Kunstpreis 2010, 30 October 2010 to 31 January 2011, Berlinische Galerie, Berlin.

edited by Berlinische Galerie Landesmuseum für moderne Kunst, Fotografie und Architektur, Berlin, preface by Thomas Köhler, author Heinz Stahlhut, with an interview by Christine Nippe with Susanne Kriemann

Graphic design Robert Beckand

Format: 21,00 × 27,00 cm, 96 pages, black and white and color, Hardcover, languages German and English. Kerber Verlag, ISBN: 978-3-86678-466-6